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scifi-fantasy-horror:

by CHRISTOPHER BALASKAS
Link

warrenellis:

"In October, people with Alzheimer’s disease will be injected with the blood of young people in the hope that it will reverse some of the damage caused by the condition."

*Shakes some dice* C’mon, Daddy needs a new set of effective anti-agathics.

(via teal-deer)

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ethertune:

By Hotwired Heart
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odinsblog:

The New Jim Crow
1. Ferguson, Missouri has a population of approximately 21,000 people — roughly 67% of those residents are Black
2. The Ferguson police department has around 53 commisioned officers —3 of them are Black
3. Ferguson had *zero* homicides for all of 2014 —until Michael Brown was murdered by Darrin Wilson
4. Things you should know: Five Myths About Black-on-Black Crime
5. Michael Brown was 18yrs old and was about to begin college. Brown had no criminal record, and despite the Ferguson PD’s smear campaign, Mike Brown PAID FOR the cigars —those facts are all important and should be known, but even if Brown was a high school dropout with prior arrests who stole the cigars, 1) it wouldn’t have made his life any less valuable, 2) we have a court system and those are not capital offenses and 3) it doesn’t change the fact that the cop who killed him, Darren Wilson, had no idea about Brown’s personal history when he executed Brown. Wilson saw only a Black teen deemed either “too uppity” or “suspicious” because of his skin color
6. Five examples: The Militarization of the police
7. It’s deeply Institutional: Police view Black Children As Less Innocent
8. This is Not the first time Ferguson’s police have been heavy handed with it’s Black residents  - Innocent Black man beaten by cops, then charged with bleeding on police officer’s uniforms 
9. So please - don’t get it twisted

odinsblog:

The New Jim Crow

1. Ferguson, Missouri has a population of approximately 21,000 people — roughly 67% of those residents are Black

2. The Ferguson police department has around 53 commisioned officers —3 of them are Black

3. Ferguson had *zero* homicides for all of 2014 —until Michael Brown was murdered by Darrin Wilson

4. Things you should know: Five Myths About Black-on-Black Crime

5. Michael Brown was 18yrs old and was about to begin college. Brown had no criminal record, and despite the Ferguson PD’s smear campaign, Mike Brown PAID FOR the cigars —those facts are all important and should be known, but even if Brown was a high school dropout with prior arrests who stole the cigars, 1) it wouldn’t have made his life any less valuable, 2) we have a court system and those are not capital offenses and 3) it doesn’t change the fact that the cop who killed him, Darren Wilson, had no idea about Brown’s personal history when he executed Brown. Wilson saw only a Black teen deemed either “too uppity” or “suspicious” because of his skin color

6. Five examples: The Militarization of the police

7. It’s deeply Institutional: Police view Black Children As Less Innocent

8. This is Not the first time Ferguson’s police have been heavy handed with it’s Black residents  - Innocent Black man beaten by cops, then charged with bleeding on police officer’s uniforms 

9. So please - don’t get it twisted

(via johnskylar)

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My own little chunk of cyberpunk!
I can’t wait to get shooting with this, and see what pops out. Honestly, it may end up being a hot mess, but it’ll at least be an interesting hot mess, dammit.

My own little chunk of cyberpunk!

I can’t wait to get shooting with this, and see what pops out. Honestly, it may end up being a hot mess, but it’ll at least be an interesting hot mess, dammit.

Tags: lytro
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Anonymous said: Hey Danny, What do you think about the whole Zoe Quinn scandal, I can understand why you would not want to answer this question, in fact I would be very surprised if you posted your answer. After hearing these allegations about Zoe, how do you think this will impact journalist in the Gaming industry?

dannyodwyer:

It’s a massive load of internet bollox. The only way in which it’ll impact journalists is by making them feel like their audience are a raving pack of fucking morons. I swear to god it’s shit like this that make talented hard-working people throw up their arms and say “fuck it, what’s the point?”.

Suddenly we’re interested in who people allegedly fucked or didn’t fuck? What the hell has any of this to do with anything? The gaming community is no better than the british tabloids right now and if we’re not ashamed yet we should be.

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flotillaonline:

The Japanese Blade Runner poster.
Found on @imgur - curated by www.flotillaonline.com

flotillaonline:

The Japanese Blade Runner poster.

Found on @imgur - curated by www.flotillaonline.com

(via thechromenet)

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shastafirecracker:

roachpatrol:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here
I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”
Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.
The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.
Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

FINALLY AN EXPLANATION

I knew this and this is why my mom and I have called doorways “lobotomy arches” for years

shastafirecracker:

roachpatrol:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here

I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”

Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.

The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.

Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

FINALLY AN EXPLANATION

I knew this and this is why my mom and I have called doorways “lobotomy arches” for years

(via dytabytes)

Photoset

0salt:

Deconstructing Masculinity & Manhood with Michael Kimmel @ Dartmouth College

This is an important message on how privilege really works.

(Source: exgynocraticgrrl, via johnskylar)

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thoughts on drax in guardians of the galaxy

thisisbennett:

jessi: the misogyny was weird and seemed tacked on
me: it’s like uhh if he’s really that literal he would see women for what they are
jessi: like he reminded me of a DnD dwarf sorta character which i would feel would be super equal with the genders
jessi: cause he’s literal and wouldnt have a stupid makes no sense prejudice
jessi: like when he called her a whore that made no sense
jessi: cause she isnt a whore so why would he call her one
jessi: like if someone ELSE called her a whore
jessi: and he went “but …she does not have sexual intercourse for currency!”
jessi: “She is a warrior!”
jessi: haha or you could carry it even further
jessi: “no she’s not…literally a whore, i was insulting her”
jessi: “why is being a whore an insult??”
jessi: “????”
jessi: misogyny didnt suit him, out of character seeming!!

One interpretation I heard was that when he was introduced to Gamora, everyone in the prison was calling her a whore. Not understanding that sort of thing, he thought that they were saying the literal truth. Which is why he didn’t seem to understand why she’d be bothered when he mentioned it later—”Why are you angry that I described your profession?”

(Source: pollums)

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"Clerics are just divine-pact Warlocks."

— The Mage (via outofcontextdnd)

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wilwheaton:

mjolnirismypenis:

imnothavinit:

Notice something in common in these photos?

It’s not what you think

I gave it away in the third pic

That’s right! None of these cops are wearing badges or name tags! I wonder why… seems like it’d be important to wear those, since it’s even illegal not to in other states…

This is actually illegal in all states. A police officer must be marked as such with name and badge at all times unless their jurisdiction states otherwise (such as an undercover officer), and even when not wearing a badge, the officer must have the badge accessible at all times and must show the badge in order to make an arrest. Name tags are not required as long as a badge is available because the badge has the officer number on it.

This has really been bothering me. The police in Ferguson are breaking the law by concealing their identities. Everyone knows this, it’s been going on for ten days, and it appears that nobody is doing anything about it.

The police are clearly and systematically violating the first amendment rights of the press, and they are getting away with it. This has been happening for days, and nobody appears to be doing anything about it.

A police officer pointed a rifle at a journalist and told him to fuck off *while he was being filmed, so he’s easily identifiable by his superiors*, and that police officer still has a job.

I know that not all cops are bad (or even most cops), but there are clearly bad cops in Ferguson, and they’re acting with complete impunity. I don’t understand why those cops aren’t being taken off the scene, and why a higher (possibly federal) authority isn’t coming in to address these things.

They also haven’t been giving their names and badge numbers when requested.

I think it’s interesting that between that and pointing assault rifles at journalists, arbitrarily arresting them on no charge, dismantling camera equipment, and threatening to kill anyone who points so much as cellphone camera at them, it seems that they’ve finally come to the realization that the greatest threat to them is the omniscient nature of the modern world.