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The problem with belonging is that you won’t get it.

It can’t be gotten. It can’t be earned. It cannot be won, stolen, or bought.

It will be given, or it won’t be had at all.

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"

The year 1969 comes up to you and asks what sort of marvels you’ve got all the way in 2014.

You explain that cameras, which 1969 knows as bulky boxes full of film that takes several days to get developed in dark rooms, are now instant affairs of point-click-send-to-friend that are also much higher quality. Also they can take video.

Music used to be big expensive records, and now you can fit 3,000 songs on an iPod and get them all for free if you know how to pirate or scrape the audio off of YouTube.

Television not only has gone HDTV and plasma-screen, but your choices have gone from “whatever’s on now” and “whatever is in theaters” all the way to “nearly every show or movie that has ever been filmed, whenever you want it”.

Computers have gone from structures filling entire rooms with a few Kb memory and a punchcard-based interface, to small enough to carry in one hand with a few Tb memory and a touchscreen-based interface. And they now have peripherals like printers, mice, scanners, and flash drives.

Lasers have gone from only working in special cryogenic chambers to working at room temperature to fitting in your pocket to being ubiquitious in things as basic as supermarket checkout counters.

Telephones have gone from rotary-dial wire-connected phones that still sometimes connected to switchboards, to cell phones that fit in a pocket. But even better is bypassing them entirely and making video calls with anyone anywhere in the world for free.

Robots now vacuum houses, mow lawns, clean office buildings, perform surgery, participate in disaster relief efforts, and drive cars better than humans. Occasionally if you are a bad person a robot will swoop down out of the sky and kill you.

For better or worse, video games now exist.

Medicine has gained CAT scans, PET scans, MRIs, lithotripsy, liposuction, laser surgery, robot surgery, and telesurgery. Vaccines for pneumonia, meningitis, hepatitis, HPV, and chickenpox. Ceftriaxone, furosemide, clozapine, risperidone, fluoxetine, ondansetron, omeprazole, naloxone, suboxone, mefloquine, – and for that matter Viagra. Artificial hearts, artificial livers, artificial cochleae, and artificial legs so good that their users can compete in the Olympics. People with artificial eyes can only identify vague shapes at best, but they’re getting better every year.

World population has tripled, in large part due to new agricultural advantages. Catastrophic disasters have become much rarer, in large part due to architectural advances and satellites that can watch the weather from space.

We have a box which you can type something into and it will tell you everything anyone has ever written relevant to your query.

We have a place where you can log into from anywhere in the world and get access to approximately all human knowledge, from the scores of every game in the 1956 Roller Hockey World Cup to 85 different side effects of an obsolete antipsychotic medication. It is all searchable instantaneously. Its main problem is that people try to add so much information to it that its (volunteer) staff are constantly busy deleting information that might be extraneous.

We have the ability to translate nearly major human language to any other major human language instantaneously at no cost with relatively high accuracy.

We have navigation technology that over fifty years has gone from “map and compass” to “you can say the name of your destination and a small box will tell you step by step which way you should be going”.

We have the aforementioned camera, TV, music, videophone, video games, search engine, encyclopedia, universal translator, and navigation system all bundled together into a small black rectangle that fits in your pockets, responds to your spoken natural-language commands, and costs so little that Ethiopian subsistence farmers routinely use them to sell their cows.

"

Scott Alexander, Promising The Moon.

We’re living in the future. And it is on the way to get better, at least with some work…

(via cyborgbutterflies)

(via teal-deer)

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80s-90s-stuff:

80s 

80s-90s-stuff:

80s 

(Source: higuchinko, via teal-deer)

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"You don’t need religion to have morals. If you can’t determine right from wrong then you lack empathy, not religion."

Unknown  (via juicyisnotcouture)

Which goes hand in hand with the Humanist argument that if it takes the threat of burning forever to keep you in line, you aren’t a moral person. A moral person does what is right without threat of punishment or promise of reward.

(via shelderon)

Honor god or honor yourself, whichever, but if you want to get right, honor each other.

(via sparklebiscuit)

When people defend the role of organized religion in our civilization, it seems like they usually fall back on how it makes people act morally/ethically. Considering that the vast majority of things in the news that make me sick are done by people who profess faith—and quite often BECAUSE of that faith—it seems like that’s the one thing religion is consistently bad at.

(Source: copulati0n, via teal-deer)

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My name is Ozymandias, king of kings: Look on my works, ye Mighty, and remember to like, comment and subscribe if you’d like to see more works like these!

maxistentialist:

(via shadesdaruma)

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lunarshinobi:

reallyfoxnews:

Fox News headlines v. real headlines, part 2425183. 

The brunette part is really important.

Fun fact, our hair color reveals our place in pansexual society. Blondes are our record keepers. The great librarians, they collect, analyze, store, and distribute information to the rest of us. They are blonde because they reflect the light of knowledge. Those with Black Hair are our inventors. They investigate, produce, and teach new technologies so that we may thrive in future times. Their hair is black because of their frequent dives into the void of the unknown. Brunettes are our ambassadors. They interact with people, plants, and animals, forging bonds that can protect us when we are threatened. Their hair is brown because of their deep connection to the earth.

And as for redheads.

You don’t want to know the purpose of the Red Heads. But may their hellfire consume our enemies.

(via kawaiikiller143)

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"

I did things in my 30s that were ignored by the world, that could have been quickly labeled a failure. Here’s a classic example; in 1974 I did a movie called Phantom of the Paradise. Phantom of the Paradise, which was a huge flop in this country. There were only two cities in the world where it had any real success: Winnipeg, in Canada, and Paris, France. So, okay, let’s write it off as a failure. Maybe you could do that.

But all of the sudden, I’m in Mexico, and a 16-year-old boy comes up to me at a concert with an album - a Phantom of the Paradise soundtrack- and asks me to sign it. I sign it. Evidently I was nice to him and we had a nice little conversation. I don’t remember the moment, I remember signing the album (I don’t know if I think I remember or if I actually remember). But this little 14 or 16, whatever old this guy was… Well I know who the guy is now because I’m writing a musical based on Pan’s Labyrinth; it’s Guillermo del Toro.

The work that I’ve done with Daft Punk it’s totally related to them seeing Phantom of the Paradise 20 times and deciding they’re going to reach out to this 70-year-old songwriter to get involved in an album called Random Access Memories.

So, what is the lesson in that? The lesson for me is being very careful about what you label a failure in your life. Be careful about throwing something in the round file as garbage because you may find that it’s the headwaters of a relationship that you can’t even imagine it’s coming in your future.

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Paul Williams (via cloudsmiling)

(via writeworld)

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visualreverence:

"…“selfie”, taken by a Eurofighter Typhoon pilot with a Go Pro camera…”
[via]

visualreverence:

"…“selfie”, taken by a Eurofighter Typhoon pilot with a Go Pro camera…”

[via]

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insanitysrequiem:

cautionlazer:

instead of spending 17000 dollars on dashcon let’s spend 17000 dollars on a remake of The Producers about the events of DashCon

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"You know, it’s absolutely amazing! Under the right circumstances, a conrunner could make more money with a flop then he could with a hit!"

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"Yes, you keep saying that, but you don’t say how.

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"Well, it’s simply a matter of creative accounting."

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"So in order for our scheme to work, we’d have to create a surefire flop!"

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"Step 1! We find the worst userbase ever assembled."

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"Step 2! We hire the worst staffers in town!"

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"Step 3! I raise $17,000!"

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"$17,000?!"

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"Yes! $8500 for me, $8500 for you. There’s a lotta gullible 12-year-olds out there!"

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"Step 4! We hire the worst panelists in town and open in Illinois, and before you can say ‘Step 5…’"

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"We close in Illinois, take our $17,000, and go to Rio!”

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“♪~We can do it~♪”

(via dytabytes)

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Or: If business people and venture capitalists didn’t learn from the dot-com crash, or the last two financial market crashes, what makes you think they’re going to even remember the 80s videogame crash?

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lightyeeeears:

Artificial Light by Fragile Oasis

lightyeeeears:

Artificial Light by Fragile Oasis

(Source: R2--D2, via visualreverence)

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refinedmind:

Just before nightfall I decided to take a walk outside. The sky was low, enveloping any object in its reach. It formed a dull, purplish haze - like nothing I’d seen before. The streets were empty. Not a single soul was out. It was oddly peaceful - imagining I was the only one left.

(via thisisbennett)